1. Interesting links I found on dentistry website

    Check links my girlfriend found:



    http://www.dentfix.ro/servicii/cosmetica-dentara/detartraj-chiuretaj-subgingival/

    3 years ago  /  0 notes

  2. Tooth Extraction

    In November, I wrote about an NYU professor implanting a camera in the back of his head.  In February, the professor had to have one of the posts supporting the camera removed.  Though he tried to combat his body’s rejection of the post with antibiotics and steroids, the pain became too much and he had to have it surgically removed.  Determined to finish the year-long project, the professor has the camera tied around his neck until the wound heals and he can reinstall it.

    Reinstall it?  Are we talking about a computer or a human head?  Though incorporating technology into the human body isn’t completely unusual, this definitely pushes the limits.  Technology and medicine have already combined together to aid in physical ailments.  I recently got a tooth implant and was amazed by the process.  My tooth was pulled and then a porous material was glued to my bone.  My bone then grew into the porous material, organic and inorganic material combined.  With this mixture, a fake tooth was attached to the implant.  Instead of a fake tooth, what if I had implanted an electric device?  What technology would be useful residing beside my teeth?

    Though the photography professor’s experiment didn’t work, I’m glad he took a risk with technology and tried something new.  It’s worth noting that the professor had to go to a body-modification artist in a tattoo shop when originally implanting the camera because no doctor would agree to it.  When it comes to artificial implants, many tests are performed before they are used on the public.  I can understand this; you don’t want to do more damage to someone who needs medical attention.  But what the professor did could be considered more of an extreme body techno-art rather than medical aid.  So should people be allowed to perform experiments with their bodies and insert all sorts of weird gadgets just to see how it will turn out?  I say yes!  The more experimentation, the better!  Many freelance experiments might fail, but the experiments will spark new innovative ideas for the future.  Cyborgs unite!

    Curt Finch is the CEO of Journyx.  Find other innovative ideas on Journyx’s Project Management Blog.

    More than a third of American adults use some form of complementary or alternative medicine, according to a government report. Natural remedies have an obvious appeal, but how do you know which ones to choose and whether the claims are backed by science? In this occasional series, Anahad O’Connor, the New York Times “Really?” columnist, explores the claims and the science behind alternative remedies that you may want to consider for your family medicine cabinet.

    The Remedy: Clove oil.

    The Claim: It relieves toothaches.

    The Science: What can you do in a pinch when you have a toothache?

    Most people reach for age-old medicine-cabinet staples like Anbesol and Orajel, which contain benzocaine, an anesthetic, as their active ingredient. Benzocaine, like many other anesthetics, can cause allergic reactions and other side effects that some people find unpalatable.

    But one natural alternative is clove oil, an essential oil from the clove plant, native to India and Indonesia and also known by the scientific but somewhat pleasant-sounding name Eugenia aromaticum. The essential oil has been shown in studies to have both analgesic and antibacterial properties, which can be particularly helpful in the case of a toothache instigated by bacteria.

    Clove oil is not for everyone. It has a strong and sometimes unpleasant taste, and if large quantities are accidentally ingested, it too can have side effects. But it was widely used in dentistry before the advent of more commercial anesthetics, and research shows it works thanks to its active ingredient, eugenol, the same compound responsible for the plant’s aroma.

    In a study published in The Journal of Dentistry in 2006, for example, a team of dentists recruited 73 adult volunteers and randomly split them into groups that had one of four substances applied to the gums just above the maxillary canine teeth: a clove gel, benzocaine, a placebo resembling the clove gel, or a placebo resembling benzocaine. Then, after five minutes, they compared what happened when the subjects received two needle sticks in those areas. Not surprisingly, the placebos failed to numb the tissue against the pain, but the clove and benzocaine applications numbed the tissue equally well.

    “No significant difference was observed between clove and benzocaine regarding pain scores,” the scientists concluded.

    The Risks: Clove oil can be found in most health food stores for a few dollars a bottle. To use it, apply a very small amount to a cotton swab or piece of tissue and apply gently to the affected area. Although considered safe when used correctly in small amounts, it can cause liver and respiratory problems when ingested in large quantities.

    Yoda's new teeth by Dyanna

    Read on:  Tooth extractions (ro)

    3 years ago  /  13 notes

  3. Igiena gurii

    Cum iti poti intretine dantura cat mai natural?

    Guilt-Free Strawberry Shake

    Preparation Time: 5 Min
    Total Time: 10 Min
    Serves: 4 people

    Ingredients

    3 cups fat-free frozen vanilla yogurt
    1 cup frozen strawberries (or fresh)
    1 cup skim (fat-free) milk

    Directions:

    Combine fat-free frozen vanilla yogurt, strawberries, and skim milk in blender. Blend on high for 1-2 minutes or until creamy and smooth. Pour into glasses and serve. Top with low-fat whipped cream if you would like and place a straw in each.

    Recipe Notes/Ideas:

    Try using different types of berries such as raspberries or blueberries. Vary the amount of milk in the recipe to make a thicker or thinner shake. Serve in a fancy glass to make it even more special!

    Strawberry Cream Horn.... by Sunshine Hanan

    Cititi aici cum se foloseste:  Sfaturi igiena orala alternativa

    3 years ago  /  4 notes

  4. Home Automation

    Home automation improvements

    Have you ever walked into a house and had trouble figuring out what switch controlled which light? Designer, Taewon Hwang comes through with this delightfully intuitive light switch concept. He takes the floorplan of a house and turns it into the design for the light switch. One of these switches could make it easy to control every light in your home from one location, or you can install multiple switches for any configuration or purpose you can imagine.

    You walk in the front door to your brand new house, you haven’t even slept here one night yet. The glow of your Taewon Hwang designed home-lighting-panel illuminates your entry with a soft glow. You toss your keys on the hook next to the door and press the three different buttons to illuminate your path to the kitchen. Taewon Hwang imagines an intuitive design for whole-house lighting systems able to be controlled from custom panels set anywhere in the house.

    [via Yanko Design]

    Another day, another Kinect hack but this one is useful! A guy called Mike used his Kinect hooked up to a home automation system to control his lights.

    As Mike walks around the room, Kinect detects where he is and turns the lights on and off accordingly. This Kinect hack is simple but seriously effective and you can see it in action after the break…

    dining table by AraiGodai

    3 years ago  /  0 notes

  5. Hello

    Hello and welcome to my new blog. I will add information like this

    I've been Shoozled! by sarah hornik

    3 years ago  /  0 notes

  6. Astonishing!

    Hey, there is an astonishing video about Yi Jin Jing Qi Gong therapy here (use Google Translate to read it) http://yijinjing.ro/about/jiang-feng-shifu/video-interviu-cu-dr-jiang-feng/

    CC-lzj-a20 by CChealthqigong

    What I found more on the net on this subject

    Posted by: CalliopeJane | March 2, 2011 2:49 PM

    OK, since some people have asked, here’s the abstract from one of those studies. I would draw attention to a few points:
    (1) “Most patients were also receiving other treatments (74%)” - that’s just plain bad science; how on earth can you tell where effects are coming from?
    (2) I can’t tell from just abstract (full text is not in the database), but there is the obvious question of whether their “equivalent attention time” was as wonderfully-wooful as the qigong treatment.
    (3) By the 8th week, differences were not statistically significant (novelty of the woo wearing off, perhaps?)
    (4) Anyone know about the quality of this journal? I’m a psychologist so really don’t know. Looking at their website, it seems rather woo-focused.


    External qigong for chronic pain.
    Authors:
    Vincent A; Hill J; Kruk KM; Cha SS; Bauer BA
    Author Address:
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. Source:
    The American Journal Of Chinese Medicine [Am J Chin Med] 2010; Vol. 38 (4), pp. 695-703.
    Abstract:
    External qigong as a pharmacotherapy adjunct was investigated in 50 subjects with chronic pain (pain lasting > 3 months with pain score of > or = 3 on 0-10 numeric analog scale) who presented to a qigong healing center. Participants were randomized to receive either external qigong treatment (EQT) or equivalent attention time (EAT) in weekly 30-min sessions for four consecutive weeks. Outcomes were assessed before and after sessions. The primary outcome measure was intensity of pain by a 10-cm visual analog scale used to rate all pain severity measurements. At 8-week follow-up, participants were contacted by telephone and mailed a questionnaire. Most had experienced pain for > 5 years (66%); the rest, for > 3 to 5 years (8%), 1 to 3 years (10%), or 3 months (10%). The most frequent concomitant diagnoses were multifactorial (26%), osteoarthritis (18%), and low back pain (12%). Most patients were also receiving other treatments (74%); none previously had EQT. Participants were randomly assigned to EQT (n = 26) or EAT (n = 24). These groups had no significant differences at baseline except for prior awareness of qigong (EQT 31% vs. EAT 63%; p = 0.025). Compared to the EAT group, EQT participants had a significant decrease in pain intensity in the 2nd (p = 0.003), 3rd (p

    Posted by: CalliopeJane | March 2, 2011 2:49 PM

    OK, since some people have asked, here’s the abstract from one of those studies. I would draw attention to a few points:
    (1) “Most patients were also receiving other treatments (74%)” - that’s just plain bad science; how on earth can you tell where effects are coming from?
    (2) I can’t tell from just abstract (full text is not in the database), but there is the obvious question of whether their “equivalent attention time” was as wonderfully-wooful as the qigong treatment.
    (3) By the 8th week, differences were not statistically significant (novelty of the woo wearing off, perhaps?)
    (4) Anyone know about the quality of this journal? I’m a psychologist so really don’t know. Looking at their website, it seems rather woo-focused.


    External qigong for chronic pain.
    Authors:
    Vincent A; Hill J; Kruk KM; Cha SS; Bauer BA
    Author Address:
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. Source:
    The American Journal Of Chinese Medicine [Am J Chin Med] 2010; Vol. 38 (4), pp. 695-703.
    Abstract:
    External qigong as a pharmacotherapy adjunct was investigated in 50 subjects with chronic pain (pain lasting > 3 months with pain score of > or = 3 on 0-10 numeric analog scale) who presented to a qigong healing center. Participants were randomized to receive either external qigong treatment (EQT) or equivalent attention time (EAT) in weekly 30-min sessions for four consecutive weeks. Outcomes were assessed before and after sessions. The primary outcome measure was intensity of pain by a 10-cm visual analog scale used to rate all pain severity measurements. At 8-week follow-up, participants were contacted by telephone and mailed a questionnaire. Most had experienced pain for > 5 years (66%); the rest, for > 3 to 5 years (8%), 1 to 3 years (10%), or 3 months (10%). The most frequent concomitant diagnoses were multifactorial (26%), osteoarthritis (18%), and low back pain (12%). Most patients were also receiving other treatments (74%); none previously had EQT. Participants were randomly assigned to EQT (n = 26) or EAT (n = 24). These groups had no significant differences at baseline except for prior awareness of qigong (EQT 31% vs. EAT 63%; p = 0.025). Compared to the EAT group, EQT participants had a significant decrease in pain intensity in the 2nd (p = 0.003), 3rd (p

    3 years ago  /  0 notes

  7. Noutati dentare

    Ce se spune despre implanturile dentare:

    Several years ago, I had to take an x-ray of a patient’s dental implant supported crown to be sure that it was firmly attached to bone a year after it was inserted. Dr. Gerald Dinerman of Malden, Ma, had inserted the implant immediately after a tooth was removed. I placed the crown on the implant six months later. Not having checked the patient’s record, I asked the patient if I were correct in thinking that the implant was under the front tooth on his right. He felt with his tongue and assured me that I was right. That x-ray was taken of the patient’s own, crowned, natural tooth; the implant was under the crown on the other side.

    When a single tooth is lost and must be replaced there are few alternatives. A tooth may be replaced with a removable device (a denture), a device that is permanently attached to other teeth (a fixed bridge), or a dental implant may be used to replace the root of the tooth and a crown or cap may be attached to it. While any of these techniques usually provide satisfactory results, the implant-supported crown is the solution that will look and feel the most like the tooth it replaces.

    A dental implant is a piece of titanium usually shaped like a screw or a cylinder. When used as a dental implant, titanium is so biocompatible that parts of bone cells actually attach to the implant. Dental x-rays and microscopy show that there is no space between the titanium and bone after healing.

    There are a few steps involved in replacing a tooth this way. First, the dentist who will make the crown and the oral surgeon must evaluate the patient’s medical history. Many medical conditions and smoking may interfere with healing and cause the bone not to knit to the implant. About one implant in a hundred will fail in the first year. These failures are usually due to the patients’ health.

    The surgeon must be sure that there is enough healthy bone to support the implant and crown. Inadequate bone may be added to with bone grafts, which may be the patient’s own bone from another area, natural bone from another source, or man made materials. Bone grafting may be done at the same time the implant is placed or a few months before. The surgeon will decide if grafting is necessary as well as the best time and material for each patient’s condition.

    Implant crowns are made by general dentists and prosthodontists (dentists who specialize in replacing and rebuilding teeth) and dental lab techs. Before the surgeon places the implant, they usually rely on the restoring dentist to tell them exactly where the tooth will be. This is done by making a device called a surgical stent that attaches to the other teeth and directs the surgeon where to place the pilot hole for the implant. Patients often hand carry this device to the surgeon so that they are sure that the device is there when the surgeon needs it.

    The surgery is usually done in two visits. The first procedure is to make a very exacting hole in the bone to accept the implant. The implant should be a very tight fit and is either screwed into the bone or pressed firmly into place. The gum is closed over the implant to allow the bone to knit to the titanium implant. Two to six months later, the gum is opened to allow the restoring dentist access to the implant.

    About two weeks after the implant is uncovered, the restoring dentist takes an impression of the teeth and the implant. The impression is sent off to a dental lab where the crown is custom made by dental technicians per the dentist’s prescription. The crown is usually ready to deliver to the patient’s mouth in two to three weeks.

    Each of the above steps is very important. Should any measurement, impression or device be off by a fraction of a millimeter the final product may not be satisfactory.

    Dental implants are often used for other purposes than to provide support for a single crown. For example:

    * The state of the art in the replacement of lower teeth has become the full denture supported by two to four implants. The implants maintain the bony support for the denture and can retain the denture in place with devices that look like coat snaps.

    * Many people have had their entire upper and lower teeth replaced with implants and fixed bridgework.

    * Implants may be used in orthodontics to provide an anchor for braces where the patient is missing teeth.

    It is always a good idea to ask your dentist for their opinion on how best to replace your tooth. Whether it is by implant, bridge or denture, the best time to replace that tooth is now.

    dental implants torrance by torrance dental implants

    Sursa: Implantul pentru proteza

    Alte recomandari:


    Obturatia

    3 years ago  /  6 notes

  8. Apreciez aceste site-uri

    Dentfix


    Dentisti Pentru Copii

    3 years ago  /  0 notes

  9. Noutati chirurgicale

    Am aflat recent de pe internet ca lucrurile nu stau chiar asa de bine cum par. Cititi putin mai jos ce se afirma:

    dental prewedding by kecek

    I’m John Struan. Contact me at jstruan at gmail.comSupport Super Punch by following the links and buying from eBay, Zazzle, and Amazon.Please assume that any product I review was sent to me for that purpose. You can read more about Super Punch here. And you’ll find my privacy policy here.Toycutter: Custom toys.The Super Punch Tarot.Subscribe in a readerLogo by Adam Koford. Singer Katy Perry made sure her pearly whites were up to scratch once she became a pop sensation. She reveals “I always said that if I ever made it as a pop star, I was going to have teeth as white as Britney Spears. So as soon as I could, I went to the dentist and had him bleach the hell out of mine.” (MT/ELL/KL)

    Copyright 2011 WENN


    Sursa: Educatie pacienti Dentfix

    3 years ago  /  1 note